• Search
August 05, 2019 |

Education facilities

In the last few years, with deteriorating “security” situation in Kashmir, the government has painfully tried to provide some immunity to the education. The focus of the government and educational bodies in Kashmir has largely been on completing syllabus in minimum number of work days. The uncertainty, which has recurred in the last few years, has forced the school authorities to make full use of the work days that have considerably shrunk due to eruptive situation. As priorities have been set, education has been suffering on several fronts, including lack of even basic facilities in schools. Contaminated water and poor sanitation facilities in the government run institutions of our valley have been adversely affecting not only the children but the entire area that these institutions are located in. According to the official data, majority of the educational institutions, particularly in rural areas lack basic facilities. With almost all schools - primary, secondary, higher secondary –facing the same kind of adverse conditions one is compelled to raise the question about the way administration and education departments are working on such issues. Absence of these basic facilities not only affects the health of the students but makes the overall atmosphere grim that in turn hits the educational standard of these schools. It also affects the quality of mind that is very important in an educational set up. The all important concern in this is whether government wants to better the performance of the schools run by it, for which it must provide the students with adequate level of infrastructure. The mismatch between existing infrastructure and the required needs of any school is blatant. We must not forget how pathetically government schools perform in board examinations. Often when the results are declared we place the blame on the teaching staff and try to roll the matter up. If we take the trouble of looking deeper into it, the pathetic condition of government-run schools will be conspicuously visible. It doesn't need any expert advice to tell us that we can have good dividends in terms of the performance of our students if only we make available the right kind of environment and pump in the required inputs. If we don't provide even the basic facilities why should we expect the students to perform equally well as those in private institutions? Secondly, the finances of the private institute are not even a patch on the government run education department. If in spite of that we cannot manage these schools it puts a big question mark on the functioning of this department. It is better if the questions raised by people are answered sooner than later.

Archive
August 05, 2019 |

Education facilities

              

In the last few years, with deteriorating “security” situation in Kashmir, the government has painfully tried to provide some immunity to the education. The focus of the government and educational bodies in Kashmir has largely been on completing syllabus in minimum number of work days. The uncertainty, which has recurred in the last few years, has forced the school authorities to make full use of the work days that have considerably shrunk due to eruptive situation. As priorities have been set, education has been suffering on several fronts, including lack of even basic facilities in schools. Contaminated water and poor sanitation facilities in the government run institutions of our valley have been adversely affecting not only the children but the entire area that these institutions are located in. According to the official data, majority of the educational institutions, particularly in rural areas lack basic facilities. With almost all schools - primary, secondary, higher secondary –facing the same kind of adverse conditions one is compelled to raise the question about the way administration and education departments are working on such issues. Absence of these basic facilities not only affects the health of the students but makes the overall atmosphere grim that in turn hits the educational standard of these schools. It also affects the quality of mind that is very important in an educational set up. The all important concern in this is whether government wants to better the performance of the schools run by it, for which it must provide the students with adequate level of infrastructure. The mismatch between existing infrastructure and the required needs of any school is blatant. We must not forget how pathetically government schools perform in board examinations. Often when the results are declared we place the blame on the teaching staff and try to roll the matter up. If we take the trouble of looking deeper into it, the pathetic condition of government-run schools will be conspicuously visible. It doesn't need any expert advice to tell us that we can have good dividends in terms of the performance of our students if only we make available the right kind of environment and pump in the required inputs. If we don't provide even the basic facilities why should we expect the students to perform equally well as those in private institutions? Secondly, the finances of the private institute are not even a patch on the government run education department. If in spite of that we cannot manage these schools it puts a big question mark on the functioning of this department. It is better if the questions raised by people are answered sooner than later.

News From Rising Kashmir

;