Power demand

Published at October 11, 2018 12:42 AM 0Comment(s)3126views


Power demand

The state’s power demand has shown a steady rise over the years. Few years ago it remained near 1400-1500 MWs at peak hours. The production in the state has been lesser than the demand and there is always deficit of the power for which the state has been shelling out a fortune. As per the government, the deficit will remain until people in the state cut down either on consumption or on the losses. Neither has been happening, and contrary to it the demand has been increasing over the years. In winter months, Kashmir faces acute shortage of power with outages becoming a norm now. As winter approaches, the concern of power outages is back on the front burner. The government’s position most likely is going to be the same – deficit, increased demand and transmission losses – therefore the outages. The state government has earlier blamed people for consuming electricity much higher than the agreed load. The theft of electricity has been a common problem. The government’s plan to upgrade the existing power infrastructure and to meter the supply points has not been implemented on the ground. The progress on installation of new meters and smaller transformers for few households has also been put on halt. The state took in hand the task of laying cables in Srinagar and some major towns so that the people can’t resort to power thefts, however the work has not been executed on ground. Majority of the households across Kashmir division have not been metered due to which the demand of the consumers is not fully met. The government has revised the deadlines from time to time to carry out the metering of the residential houses. In the wake of the approaching winter season the demand for electricity will further go up, but as has been witnessed in the past the PDD has resorted to unscheduled power cuts which is causing major inconvenience to the people. During winters even the electricity remains snapped to the hospitals due to which they have to make heavy expenses on the use of diesel to run the central heating system. The power demand will further go up in the coming years as the industrial activity in the state picks up. There is a dire need that the government works out a plan to meet the growing demand of electricity. The frequent power outages are a major dampener and reduce the prospectus of the growth of economy in the state.

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