India-Pakistan Talks

 

 

When opportunity comes knocking on one’s door

Published at December 06, 2018 12:25 AM 0Comment(s)2472views

Opportunity created by Kartarpur Sahib must not be allowed to slip away, for it is born of radically different and deeply enduring roots 


When opportunity comes knocking on one’s door

Prem Shankar Jha  

When opportunity comes knocking, unbidden, to one’s door, a wise man does not let her slip away.  India has done this twice in the past seventy years: when it shooed away American companies that came to Asia in search of a cheap labour platform to manufacture goods for the world market, and sent them on to south-east Asia.

It did this a second time when risk averse advisers in both India and Pakistan succeeded in delaying the fleshing out of the Manmohan-Musharraf framework agreement to end the Kashmir dispute signed in Delhi in 2005, till Musharraf lost his power to push it through the Pakistan National Assembly in 2008.

The monumental silence with which Prime minister Modi greeted Pakistan’s offer three months ago, the curt reassertion last week by Foreign minister SushmaSwaraj that India would not attend the SAARC summit in Pakistan, and the Congress leadership’s tepid reaction to the initiative, has made it likely that we will send her away yet again.

The reason for the Modi government’s lack of enthusiasm is written in saffron across the sky: having wrecked the economy, failed to create any jobs and alienated each and every one of India’s neighbours, it has nothing left to fall back upon in its bid to win the 2019 general election except the whipping up of paranoia towards Muslims, towards Pakistan and towards China.

But how does one explain the ambivalence of the Congress? For was it not Prime minister Manmohan Singh who said in 2007 that his dream was to be able to have breakfast in Delhi, Lunch in Islamabad and dinner in Kabul on the same day?

Was it also not Dr. Singh who fashioned the Delhi Framework Agreement? If these initiatives were not popular why did the Congress win the 2009 election with a near- majority of its own?

The opportunity created by Kartarpur Sahib must not be allowed to slip away, for it is born of radically different and deeply enduring roots.

While previous peace initiatives originated in the corridors of Islamabad and New Delhi, this one has originated in a small village close to the India Pakistan border.

While previous negotiations have been carefully planned and orchestrated, this one is unplanned, disorderly and very largely spontaneous.

Finally, while all previous initiatives have started at the top of the social and political pyramid, this one has been born out a yearning among the poorest people on both sides of the Punjab border for peace and reconciliation.

The Gurudwara at Kartarpur Sahib was established by Guru Nanak in 1522. It was there that he lived for 18 years, wrote the Guru Granth Sahib, and in all probability, died. It is therefore the second holiest shrine in the Sikh religion. Partition forced all the Sikhs of Punjab to one side of the newly created border, but left Kartarpur Sahib a bare three kilometres on its other side.

As a result, for seventy years Sikhs have been going in their hundreds of thousands to the closest point on the border from where they can see the domes of the Gurudwara, to pray.

The idea of a visa -free corridor from the border to Kartarpur sahib was first mooted by prime minister Vajpayee during his bus journey to Lahore in February 1999.

Despite the Kargil war, the Nawaz Sharif government responded positively the next year, but the Pakistan army, which was smarting from its defeat in Kargil, was in no mood for compromise.

The spate of ISI-backed militant attacks on high value targets in India that followed and eventually triggered Operation Parakram, and the ISI’s reckless use of Mujahideen in Kashmir put an end to any further discussion of the subject.

The possibility of a corridor was raised by Navjot Singh Sidhu three months ago when he attended Imran Khan’s swearing in as prime minister. Sidhu had gone in his personal capacity, as one of the three Indian cricketers whom Imran had invited.

According to his account of what followed, not only did Khan leap at his suggestion but General Bajwa, the Pakistan army chief, who was present at the function immediately offered to build a barricaded corridor from the border to the Gurudwara that would prevent any actual contact between the pilgrims and people in the intervening area. It was this spontaneous offer that made Sidhu give Bajwa a Punjabi Jhappi.

But was the offer from Khan and Bajwa really a spur of the moment reaction to Sidhu’s suggestion?

It might have been had only Imran Khan made it, for he has been saying from the day of his inauguration that, “If India takes one step forward, then we will take two steps forward toward friendship.”

But why should General Bajwa have gone that step further? A knee-jerk assessment would be that he saw it as a propaganda opportunity and, in case Delhi reacted negatively, a chance to rekindle disaffection in Punjab.

But Imran Khan made it crystal clear in his speech and press conference that he and the army are “all on one page” in wanting to mend ties with India. Is such a radical change of heart in the Pakistan army really possible?

The answer, with suitable caveats, is ‘yes’ because, seven decades after Independence, its policy of jumping from the back of one circus-horse to another while keeping its gaze locked firmly on Kashmir, has reached its pre-destined end—there are no more horses left to ride.

Almost 35 years ago General Zia-ul-Haq felt that he could afford to adopt a Forward Policy because Pakistan’s GDP had been growing at 5 to 6 percent per annum for three decades; it was an indispensable ally of the United States in the latter’s proxy war against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, and therefore had no dearth of foreign exchange to buy military toys.

Today’s Pakistan could not be more different. It has been chastened by its failure to spark secession in Punjab and Kashmir: despite every pain that India has inflicted on Kashmir, a 2009 Chatham House poll in the Valley, showed that while a majority of its people wanted a radical change in Kashmir’s relationship with India, only 2.5 to 7.5 per cent wanted to join Pakistan.

Not only has it lost the patronage of the US, but the Trump administration, and most of the world, considers Pakistan to be a dangerous and unpredictable breeding ground for terrorists all over the world, and the principal threat to Pax Americana in Afghanistan.

Islamabad has attempted to replace the US with China and Saudi Arabia as its political, military and economic sponsors, but China has been far less tolerant towards its use of terrorism to realise its regional aspirations than Washington was three decades ago.

This is because, contrary to the prevailing impression in India, Beijing’s huge investment in the Karakoram-Gwadar transit corridor is, like other projects of its Belt-Road Initiative, more defensive than offensive, for it is primarily intended to create one of several back doors for its trade with Asia, Europe and Africa to pass through in case the US and its allies decide to block the sea lanes through which most of its imports and exports currently pass.

Its fear of the US’ naval power is understandable because its dependence upon trade for its economic growth is the highest for a large industrial economy that the world has ever known. Its dependence upon trade to generate employment is even greater.

So from the early days of its investment in Pakistan, Beijing has been putting a quiet but unrelenting pressure on Pakistan to crackdown on militant groups and maintain peace with India, especially in the Karakoram region.

Till the end of February this pressure was private, and bilateral. Then on February 23, China stopped shielding Pakistan and agreed to put it on the “gray list” of the Financial Action Task Force, a global body created to monitor the financing of militant organisations all over the world.

Pakistan was put on the list in June. It now has till June 30 next year to show that it has taken decisive action to curb action against organisations in the country that are sponsoring militant activities.

This withdrawal of support could not have come at a worse time for Pakistan, for it is facing its worst economic crisis in a decade.

In 2017-18 it recorded a 19 billion dollar balance of payments deficit, amounting to 5.7 percent of its GDP. The Pakistani rupee has depreciated by 20 percent in less than a year and its foreign exchange reserves have fallen to under $ 10 billion.

Till now Islamabad has relied upon loans from China and Saudi Arabia to remain solvent, but Saudi Arabia too agreed to put Pakistan on the “grey List” last February. Pakistan has therefore been left with no option but to go to the IMF for another - its 13th -bail-out.

That loan will now almost certainly come with conditionalities that will cross the border between economics and politics.

Finally, the Pakistan army has been locked in a civil war for more than a decade. It has managed to establish a semblance of peace in the tribal areas by denuding its Indian border of troops.

But insurgency and sectarian killings have continued to grow in other parts of the country. It would be surprising indeed if it had not begun to look for a way out of the morass.

To Pakistan Army High Command too, therefore, peace with India must have begun to look like the silver bullet that can end most of its miseries.

The is almost certainly why General Bajwa seized the olive branch that Sidhu innocently extended at Imran Khan’s swearing in with such alacrity.

What Pakistan has essentially done at Kartarpur, therefore, is to ask for India’s help in ending its own impossible predicament.

Peace with India will remove the very ground on which much of the Islamist extremism which has spawned militant feeds in Pakistan. Since these groups gain their legitimacy by posing as the champions of the oppressed in Kashmir, finding a solution to the dispute that Islamabad can present to its own people as a fulfilment of its commitment to them is the best way forward.

It would therefore be folly for India not to seize the opening that Kartarpur Sahib has created to end the Cain versus Abel conflict that has held both countries back while the rest of Asia has raced ahead.

An immediate cease fire along the Line of Control in Kashmir, the resumption of talks, involving Kashmiri leaders in the deliberations, and an agreement to review the Manmohan –Musharraf framework agreement, will start the ball rolling towards peace.

prem.jha262@gmail.com

 

 

Advertisement

    Leave a Reply










    Back To Top